Conversation: Potential Perils of Crowdfunding

Mary Jo WhiteThe Securities and Exchange Commission, through December 23, 2013, is seeking public comments on a proposal under Title III of the JOBS Act that would permit crowdfunding in connection with the purchase of securities. Nothing is perfect, and if adopted, investors and issuers alike will need to exercise caution.
 
Following is a tongue-in-cheek dialog between SEC Chair Mary Jo White, with comments taken verbatim from a press release issued by the SEC October 23, and a completely fictitious investor, expressing concerns:
 
Mary Jo:  I’m pleased that we’re in a position to seek public comment on a proposal to permit crowdfunding.
 
Investor:  What is crowdfunding?
 
Mary Jo:  Crowdfunding describes an evolving method of raising capital that has been used outside the securities arena to raise funds through the Internet for a variety of projects ranging from innovative product ideas to artistic endeavors.
 
Investor: Umm…I’m not sure I understand.  What does that have to do with securities?
 
Mary Jo:  Title III of the JOBS Act created an exemption under securities laws so that this type of funding method can be easily used to offer and sell securities as well. Securities purchased in a crowdfunding transaction could not be resold for a period of one year.
 
Investor:  Oh, I get it now.   You mean I soon will be able to take my hard-earned money and buy stocks in small, risky companies I never heard of?  Companies that may be run by rip-off artists.  Companies that have not been vetted by an investment bank. Stocks that will not necessarily trade in the public markets—not even on the OTC Bulletin Board?  And stocks that I may not even be able to easily sell?
 
Mary Jo: The Securities and Exchange Commission voted unanimously to propose rules under the JOBS Act to permit companies to offer and sell securities through crowdfunding.
 
Investor: Huh?  Maybe I don’t get it after all. What are the commissioners thinking?
 
Mary Jo:  The intent of the JOBS Act is to make it easier for startups and small businesses to raise capital from a wide range of potential investors and provide additional investment opportunities for investors.
 
Investor: Opportunities you say?  Aren’t there enough investment opportunities out there already? Do we really need more?  I’m scared. I want my mommy.
 
Mary Jo: We want this market to thrive in a safe manner for investors.
 
Investor:  O.K. I understand that’s what you want.  But President Obama wanted the Affordable Care Act website to work.  Besides, wasn’t the SEC supposed to be watching folks like that Madoff fellow?  He should have been easy to monitor, compared with the thousands of small entrepreneurs who will want to sell securities to unsuspecting investors?
 
Mary Jo:  There is a great deal of excitement in the marketplace about the crowdfunding exemption.
 
Investor:  Did I say I am scared?
 
Roger Pondel, rpondel@pondel.com
 
 

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