Up ‘Periscope’

Periscope_033015Twitter’s launch of Periscope, which allows anybody to live stream video from a smartphone to anyone in the world with a simple click of a button, has profound implications for the communications world, creating millions of “on-the-scene reporters” and another medium to engage for the investor relations and public relations industry.  Fittingly, in the announcement of the app, Twitter said, “A picture may be worth a thousand words, but live video can take you someplace and show you around.”

With the ability to instantly notify followers that you’re live, Periscope adds an element that’s been missing with the use of video in IR and PR worlds: immediacy.  Live streaming provides for immediate action in a crisis, while also allowing for greater transparency by going beyond the 140-word character limit of Twitter.  Everything from an earnings conference call to a product announcement can now be broadcast live.

At the same time, it opens up a whole set of risks, including as PR News discusses, a “new chapter for the hot-mic problem,” not to mention a bevy of disclosure issues. Of course, it will take several years before live streaming becomes more commonplace. In the meantime, it makes sense to ponder the possibilities of how it could make your story more compelling.

– Matt Sheldon, msheldon@pondel.com

For Public Companies, It’s Always Something

It seems like every day there is a new article or hypothesis about corporate boards and governance.  Diversity…Say on Pay…Proxy Access…Tenure.  You name it, it’s been debated.

A new Ernst and Young study takes on the topic of board member skills, or more specifically providing more disclosure to investors about the skills and experience of board members.  According to Ernst and Young, “Investors increasingly seek confirmation that boards have the skill sets and expertise needed to provide strategic counsel and oversee key risks facing the company, including environmental and social risks.”  Of the 50 institutional investors interviewed, more than three-quarters do not believe companies do enough to explain why they have the right people in the boardroom.

The Wall Street Journal reported that a thorough approach to selecting directors is more important than lower mandatory retirement ages for board members.  It only makes sense that investors be more concerned about what each director can bring to the table (pun intended) than how old that director is or how long they have been serving.  Although, these issues are also hot buttons for today’s boards.

As we tweeted earlier this week, there are more than 100 proxy access proposals thus far in 2015, up from just 17 last year, signaling that institutional investors want to be part of the process for selecting who will be guiding the companies they own.  Fourteen corporations are taking a more proactive approaching by voluntarily agreeing to give investors the ability to nominate their own directors.

It will likely be some time before corporate America turns over the board selection process, but in the meantime, we continue to believe that disclosure and transparency in governance for listed companies are the best way to build and maintain credibility and goodwill.

– Laurie Berman, lberman@pondel.com

Remaking Tuesday

EBOTIt’s Tuesday…that day of the week when your lazy Sunday afternoon nap is a distant (but fond) memory and the manic frenzy of Monday has passed, but the rest of the work week still seems like a long stretch of road.

Here at PondelWilkinson, we’ve decided that Tuesday needs a makeover. For too long, Tuesday has been treated like the Jan of the Brady Bunch week – taken for granted, overlooked and underappreciated despite serving as the stepping stone to Hump Day, Throwback Thursday, and Thank God It’s Friday.

In our humble opinion, it’s time we remember and acknowledge why #EverythingsBetterOnTuesday (or #EBOT, for short)

Here’s just the start of a list we’ve come up with:

  • #EverythingsBetterOnTuesday because let’s face it — it isn’t Monday
  • #EverythingsBetterOnTuesday because you can usually find some two-fer deal
  • If you’re in PR, #EverythingsBetterOnTuesday because it’s easier to talk to reporters
  • #EverythingsBetterOnTuesday because you can usually find a radio station that will play two songs in a row from your favorite artist : )
  • If you’re in the stock market, #EverythingsBetterOnTuesday because it’s typically the largest purchase day of the week (Wall Street types don’t call it “Turnaround Tuesday” for nothing)

So after you finish that last sip of your morning coffee, square up those shoulders and take a moment to appreciate the day. Because everything’s better on Tuesday.

Share with us your photos and thoughts on why #EBOT ; ) We’ll share our favorite posts next Tuesday!

–E.E. Wang and George Medici

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

The Good, the Bad and the Ugly is a periodic feature by PondelWilkinson that turns a critical eye on the way quarterly results are communicated.

The Good

Earnings season is nearing its end, and after all of the Q4 news releases and conference call transcripts have been parsed and picked away at like a bone-in fillet, it’s time to debrief about the good, the bad and the ugly when it comes to communicating results.

Let’s start with the good. More companies are embracing the use of video when conducting earnings calls, and T-Mobile did an excellent job streaming its Q4 results in real time.   Of course, the company delivered record growth, so who knows if the positive energy would still pervade on video if the numbers were worse.

The Bad

Certain adjectives and verbs continue to see the light of day in earnings releases when they should’ve been put to bed a long time ago. Following is a short list: pleased, thrilled, excited, disruptive, highly anticipated, state-of-the-art, cutting edge, and leading.

The Ugly

I was recently invited to speak to MBA students at the University of Southern California about investor relations.  We were discussing conference calls and how analysts and investors queue up during the calls to ask management questions.   Apparently, a fairly prominent short seller had lectured to the same group a few weeks ago and said he poses as a well-known, long-only buyside institution to get into the queue and then when it’s his turn to ask a question, he hammers home his short-sighted agenda.

OK, that’s a wrap for the good, the bad and the ugly for Q4. Until next quarter.

– Evan Pondel, epondel@pondel.com

Tweet TV: Social Media is Making Television Fun Again

EllenNearly 37 million people watched the 87th Annual Academy Awards, down from 44 million last year.  Many reasons may have contributed to the viewership drop, everything ranging from the show’s host performance, to the celebrity of the actors themselves, to the types of films that were nominated.

For many pundits that offered critiques of this year’s Oscars, reviews bordered on ho-hum and boring.  But what may have been seen as a lackluster TV event, much of the action was happening on social media, more so on Facebook than on Twitter.

It’s hard not to watch a live TV event these days without being asked to tweet this or hashtag that.  This year’s Academy Awards were no exception.  While Twitter generated far less interaction than last year, 6 million tweets were posted about the 2015 #Oscars, still a fairly significant number of impressions.

Remember last year’s Ellen DeGeneres’ selfie that actually “broke” Twitter for 20 minutes?  The talk-show host’s photo was retweeted 3.3 million times and seen by 37 million people.  Experts valued the exposure to Samsung (a sponsor of The Oscars and the type of smartphone that was used to snap the photo) in the hundreds of millions of dollars.  While having several of Hollywood’s top A-list celebs in the photo certainly helped it go viral, the tweet nonetheless was a successful integration of TV and social media.

Facebook this year received more engagement, where 21 million people generated 58 million posts, likes or comments about the Oscars, up from 11.1 million users in 2014 generating 25 million interactions.  The social network this year also introduced its Trending Oscars experience that allowed fans to connect in real time about the show, which may have led to the huge engagement.

Clearly, the social experience between Twitter and Facebook is much different, although one thing is abundantly clear for both: engagement.  Today’s social platforms enable two-way communication in real time like never before.  And because tweets and posts are searchable and have a long life span – which may not always be a good thing – the value of engagement is much greater.

For the naysayers about social media, and there are those still out there, new media platforms are extending brands way beyond the TV set and onto the Internet, where discussions continue on for days and even months.

For TV in particular, social media may be giving it a sorely needed boost, especially since fewer people than ever are watching television.   Good content doesn’t hurt either.    Either way, social media is here to stay and actually making TV fun again.

– George Medici, gmedici@pondel.com