Overused Words in 2015

The year is coming to a close quickly and reflecting on what we’ve learned in the last 12 monthsuni will hopefully set us up for success in 2016.

Much of our work at PondelWilkinson involves writing, and in the world of investor relations and financial communications, certain words are used more frequently than others in the span of a year.

Following is a top-10 list of the most overused words in 2015, along with (tongue-and-cheek) alternatives for the year ahead.

  1. Disruptive/transformeresque
  2. Unicorn/rhinoceros (two horns are better than one)
  3. Leading/simply the best
  4. Revolutionary/other worldly
  5. Activist/Laird Hamilton (one very active guy)
  6. Deep value/there’s treasure buried in them hills
  7. Emerging/turtle head
  8. Strategic alliance/friends with benefits
  9. Merger/friends with benefits (yes, a repeat)
  10. Consolidation/I crush your head

– Evan Pondel, epondel@pondel.com

For The Love of Polling

think it aboutMedia love polls. Data  helps identify trends that can be turned into stories or support or debunk a particular story narrative.

Polls have become instrumental in helping shape politics. Consider the GOP debates for the 2016 presidential election. Approval ratings are determining what candidate gets national camera time and who doesn’t.

Americans love polls too, unless they are asked, “Would you like to take a brief survey?” We get to find out what is the best-tasting ice cream or coffee, what is America’s favorite color (blue by the way), and that four out of five dentists recommend Trident to their patients who chew gum.

Polling in the U.S. pretty much started in the early 19th century during Andrew Jackson’s second presidential bid when supporters conducted polls at rallies. Much has changed since then, partly because in 1932, George Gallup through a new methodology accurately predicted that his mother-in-law would win a local Iowa election for secretary of state. The rest is history.

Today we have all kinds of polls, and not just political ones. There are straw polls, opinion polls, tracking polls, exit polls, and surveys of all kinds. But can polling really influence decisions? If the majority of Americans say they would vote for a particular candidate, would that sway someone’s decisions one way or another? Many political pundits say that President Clinton was notorious for using polls, but did that comprise a desire for popularity from doing what he believed was right? Whatever the reason, he certainly was one of America’s more popular presidents as the country experienced considerable economic growth and expansion during his tenure.

Polling helps keep the media business alive, and as many PR pros can attest, helps define business stories and trends that are so vital to reporters.

There is much debate on polling in America, some even calling for banning them. General consensus, however, believe otherwise, and say that polls serve a greater good. Another important question is how accurate are polls? Most experts agree that, when done right, they are accurate, which is corroborated by modern history, including Gallup’s 1932 prediction.

One organization that is surveying the attitudes and trends shaping America and the world is the Pew Research Center. Did you know that 51 percent of people across 40 countries including the U.S. believe they already are being harmed by climate change? That number drops to 41 percent among Americans. No doubt these numbers can impact policy making decisions whatever side the climate change debate you sit on.

So, it’s probably safe to say polls are good, unless the next poll shows that they aren’t.

- George Medici, gmedici@pondel.com

Peek-a-boo, I See You

Attention public companies: The Public Company Accounting Oversight Board, affectionately known as “peek-a-boo,” is watching you ever so closely…and wants to see even more of you.

That was the underlying message delivered by PCAOB Board member Greg Jonas as he addressed the recent second annual University of California-Irvine’s Audit Committee Summit, sponsored in part by PondelWilkinson.

“Regulators’ role is to be sure that investors hear the good, the bad and the ugly,” Jonas said. “Our challenge is to be useful and not just get in the way.”

Jonas spoke about the PCAOB’s “concept” issued in July, seeking public comment on 28 potential audit quality indicators to help identify insights into how high quality audits are achieved.

Jim Schnurr, Chief Accountant for the Securities and Exchange Commission, who is responsible for establishing and enforcing accounting and auditing policy and served as the event’s keynote speaker, interpreted the PCAOB’s project as a determining factor of whether additional public company disclosures should be made, particularly regarding greater oversight of management.

“The audit committee is in an excellent position to gain insight into management controls,” said Schnurr. “Avoidance of boilerplate reporting and minimizing the risk of litigation should be high on the directors’ agendas.”

Schnurr offered additional tips for audit committee members that should resonate with management:

  • Focus on effective disclosure
  • Increase the use of hyperlinks in communications
  • Periodically re-evaluate the relevance of disclosure items
  • Use solid judgment about what is not being disclosed
  • Be certain that audit committee members have the bandwidth to properly fill their roles

Two expert panel discussions followed Schnurr’s and Jonas’s addresses. Panelist Bala Iyer, audit committee chair at QLogic, offered a number of suggestions, focusing heavily on three: asking tough questions; trusting management; and taking the time to thoroughly understand the business.

The Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, which created the PCAOB, requires that auditors of U.S. public companies be subject to external, independent oversight for the first time in history. The Board has no authority over public companies, but its work can have deep implications. Here’s looking atchya.

– Roger Pondel, rpondel@pondel.com