Annals of Communication—Thank you, Dave

I had a breakfast meeting the other day at the Mid-Town Café on 56th between Lex and Third in New York City. It’s not a fancy place, but one of many non-descript diners where the waitresses call you honey as you walk in the door and ask if you want coffee as you are getting seated.

A view shows U.S. postal service mail boxes at a post office in Encinitas

The meeting was arranged by my long-time colleague, Gary Fishman, as a casual introduction to meet the principal of an investor relations advisory firm, similar to PondelWilkinson. For purposes of this blog, I’ll just call him Dave.

No need here to discuss our conversation, which is not the point of this piece, so fast forward to the end of our meal. (I had oatmeal and blueberries, the other two gents had eggs.) The waitress brought our check. All three of us made a move to our wallets. My credit card was out first, and with the total check being $19.95, I volunteered to buy. Then we went on our ways.

Within a couple of hours, I received a thank-you email from Gary for my time and for buying breakfast. I was going to email David to tell him how much I enjoyed meeting him, but thought I would wait a while, for certainly he also would be sending me a thank-you email…or so I thought. Then I forgot about it.

I returned to California, and the following day, I received a letter in the mail. It was from Dave, saying how much he enjoyed our visit and thanking me for playing host. In today’s era of speed, did I need instant thanks via email anyway? Probably not.

Receiving the letter struck a chord. While the message could have been precisely the same in an email, there’s something to be said for taking the time to send a letter through the U.S. Postal Service…it commands attention. Compared with hundreds of email messages that we all receive every day, it was the only personal communication I received via mail all week.

– Roger Pondel, rpondel@pondel.com

 

 

 

 

 

The Write Stuff

I recently taught a writing course at NIRI’s Fundamentals Conference, which is mostly geared toward IROs who are relatively new to the business, as well as more experienced folks who’d like to brush up on the basics.

My presentation focused on the fundamentals of writing earnings news releases, conference call scripts and shareholder letters. The biggest challenge people said they faced is crafting a compelling story in what has become a template-driven world.

Following are some boiled-down writing tips from my presentation to help make that writing resonate:

Know Your Audience

Your written piece should address the following:

  • What Information do they need?
  • Why do they need it?
  • What do they currently believe?
  • What should they believe?

Plan & Organize Your Content

  • Identify your key messages
  • Create and work from an outline
  • Use blocks of content to develop a sequence of thoughts
  • Test your sequence for clarity

Draft Without Judgment

  • Fill in the outline
  • Work quickly – don’t agonize
  • Read it out loud. Is the flow logical?
  • Listen to your own ears
  • Give it a rest and re-read in the morning

Revise for Power

  • Punch up the opening and closing
  • Change passive voice to active voice
  • Strip out excess words, phrases and fluff
  • Make it natural and conversational – should “fit” the company/spokesperson

– Evan Pondel, epondel@pondel.com

Best and Worst

Some CEOs are great and offer stellar business advice. Some CEOs are not so great and fall victim to errors of judgment.  Today’s blog looks at some of the best and worst (of 2016), courtesy of Forbes (via MSN) and Business Insider.

Best: “It takes 20 years to build a reputation and five minutes to ruin it. If you think about that, you’ll do things differently.” – Warren Buffett

Worst: While defending a significant price increase for an important medication, a healthcare company’s CEO claimed that the product was fairly priced and blamed high-deductible health plans for the increase. In October 2016, the company “agreed to pay a fine of $465 million to settle accusations that it overcharged the government” for its products.

Best: “The biggest risk is not taking any risk…In a world that’s changing really quickly, the only strategy that is guaranteed to fail is not taking risks.” – Mark Zuckerberg

Worst: After last year’s presidential election, the CEO of a cybersecurity startup threatened on Facebook to kill the president-elect. He resigned from the company in November 2016, and later admitted that what he said “was incredibly dumb, perhaps the dumbest thing I have ever said.  I really only have myself to blame for this.”

Best: “My mother always taught me to never look back in regret but to move on to the next thing. The amount of time people waste dwelling on failures rather than putting the energy into another project always amazes me.” – Richard Branson

Worst: When the CEO of a large U.S. bank only shouldered some of the blame for opening new customer accounts without permission in order to meet quotas, and put much of the blame on “the 5,300 low-level employees who had already been fired,” Senator Warren accused him of “gutless leadership.” Later he admitted full responsibility and stepped down from his position.

Laurie Berman, lberman@pondel.com

Is LinkedIn the New Facebook?

LinkedIn these days seems to be less about posting “business” content and more around publishing selfies, memes and math puzzles.

Ironically, these Facebook-like posts generally get more traction. But all engagement is not always good engagement, just like all publicity is not always good publicity.

Interestingly enough, the Pew Research Center found that more workers ages 18-49 have discovered information on social media that lowered their professional opinion of a colleague, compared to those who garnered an improved estimation of a co-worker from online platforms. So, be careful what you post.

LinkedIn prides itself on “connecting the world’s professionals to make them more productive and successful.” What’s happened, however, is the line between “work” and “consumer” content has been blurred, causing LinkedIn professionals to lambast what they see as irrelevant posts, stating: “This is not Facebook!”

A recent post on LinkedIn.

A graphic that accompanied a post on LinkedIn.

The reality is that LinkedIn is competing with Facebook. Late last year, Mark Zuckerberg’s social network announced it was testing a feature that would let page administrators create job postings and receive applications from candidates. This undoubtedly will put pressure on LinkedIn’s Talent Solutions business, which comprised 65 percent of the company’s 3Q 2016 revenues.

With 467 million members in over 200 countries and territories, LinkedIn, now owned by Microsoft, is growing at a rate of more than two new members per second. This quails in comparison to Facebook’s 1.79 billion monthly active users, but the company’s growth shows more professionals see value in the platform.

So what does the future look like for LinkedIn? Consider the following:

  • LinkedIn will become an even more valuable business networking tool among business professionals, surpassing Pew’s estimate of the 14 percent of professionals who use the online platform for work-related purposes.
  • “Irrelevant” posts will continue, at least in the short term, but will have an adverse effect on those who publish non-related content.
  • Thoughtful, engaging and pertinent posts that resonate with key audiences will generate positive engagement.
  • Business organizations and individuals will learn how to leverage this network beyond recruitment and job searches.

Much can be said by the old adage “all work and no play …,” so it’s refreshing to see some brevity in our daily work lives. But these matters may be best suited for Facebook and not LinkedIn.

– George Medici, gmedici@pondel.com