Exceptional CEOs

I’ve worked with many CEOs over the last 25 years. Some great, some good, and some who didn’t quite make the grade.  The great ones had a few traits in common…they were excellent communicators, compassionate and whip smart.  (Italicized text represents my own editorial.)

The Harvard Business Review recently outlined four essential behaviors of successful CEOs:

  • Making quick decisions with conviction. Decisive.
  • Engaging for impact. Collaborative.
  • Proactively adapting. Doer.
  • Delivering reliably. Expectation setter.

Russell Reynolds Associates, a global search and leadership advisory firm, offers the following in their thought leadership blog:

  • Willingness to take calculated risks. Gutsy.
  • Bias toward action. Doer.
  • Ability to efficiently “read” people. Insightful.
  • Forward thinking. Innovative.
  • Intrepid. Courageous.

And from CNBC reporting on a panel at SXSW which examined the traits of many successful Silicon Valley CEOs:

  • Psychopathic???

I admit, this one stumped me. Dictionary.com describes psychopathy as “a mental disorder in which an individual manifests amoral and antisocial behavior, lack of ability to love or establish meaningful personal relationships, extreme egocentricity, failure to learn from experience, etc.”

Doesn’t exactly scream successful CEO to me. However, venture capitalist Bryan Stolle believes that psychopaths are common within the CEO ranks because to successfully start a company you need to be “uncompromising in your vision, which requires a hearty dose of both ego and persistence, and you have to be willing to sacrifice almost everything for success.”  Still not sure I buy it.

Dr. Igor Galynker, the associate chairman for research in the Department of Psychiatry at Mount Sinai Beth Israel, believes that “lacking empathy, more often than not, will help you in an environment where you have to make decisions that create negative consequences by necessity for other people.” I’ve never known or worked with a psychopathic CEO, but according to a 2016 study, 21 percent of senior professionals in the U.S. had “clinically significant levels of psychopathic traits.”  Kind of frightening for those working with these 21 percent.

While collaboration, innovation and insightfulness are clearly important CEO qualities, I suppose it is possible that a little bit of ego, tenacity and charm could also result in success.

Laurie Berman, lberman@pondel.com

Not Your Average Covfefe

Whether investor relations or strategic public relations, or even in politics, we all know that words matter.

Every once in a while, I get stumped, sometimes amused, by simple-sounding, strange words that I have never seen before. Some only have four letters. I jotted down ten real words I read over the past couple of months that I am happy to share with PW Insight readers.

Test yourself and see how many you know. And please send me a quick email if you get even half of them right. Call me immediately if you know them all.

  1. flense
  2. tankles
  3. nish
  4. fob
  5. wheedle
  6. lanx
  7. puce
  8. yeta
  9. peen
  10. pelf

The answers:

  1. to strip blubber or skin from a whale or a fish
  2. a sound louder than a tinkle
  3. nothing
  4. chain attached to a watch
  5. to coax by flattery
  6. a platter for serving meat
  7. a dark red or purple/brown color
  8. awesome
  9. end of a hammer head opposite the face
  10. money gained in a dishonorable way

Roger Pondel, rpondel@pondel.com

Pretzels as a Barometer of Being Busy

Every office has its busy times, be they monthly, quarterly or annually.Pretzek

For investor relations and public relations firms, such periods vary from quarterly financial reporting, to client crises, and unexpected projects. In our office, a look at our “pretzel barrel” and how fast it is depleted is a great gauge of how busy we are.

It is filled every Monday, and by most normal Fridays, it is half full. Other Fridays, about a quarter full…which signifies a busy week; and during earnings season, I’m surprised there’s a pretzel left.

I’m not sure how or why the pretzel barrel got started in our office, but the origin of pretzels is intriguing. As the story goes, pretzels were created by an Italian monk more than 2000 years ago, who baked strips of dough and folded them into a shape resembling a child crossing his arms in prayer. The pretzel history books say nothing about the added salt.

When eating pretzels in 2017, perhaps we are subconsciously praying for help; or, as today’s health-oriented psychologists may say…we may be stress eating.

Regardless of the reason we eat pretzels—some of us do so simply because we like them—keeping one’s composure during busy times is key. I must admit that our staff is pretty good about maintaining the calm. Most days, it sure feels like we are busy. But heck, it’s Friday, and this week our barrel is still three-quarters full.

–Janet Simmons, jsimmons@pondel.com