The Public Relations (and Future) of Healthcare

U.S. Senate Debates Future of Healthcare Reform

U.S. Senate Debates Future of Healthcare Reform

There was a time not so long ago when healthcare was a huge mystery, understood only by doctors and industry insiders. Today, much of that mystery has been unlocked through the Internet and a curious populace, as billions of dollars are being spent marketing drugs and services to physicians and consumers alike.

The conversation (and controversy) surrounding healthcare in the U.S. continues to evolve at both the industry and legislative levels. With a divided Congress and an influx of emerging technologies, the need for enhanced communication by healthcare companies is greater than ever.

Providers, hospitals, biotech, pharmaceutical and medical device companies, among others, all have distinct reasons and needs for communicating, from securing funding, to FDA reporting and complying with other regulatory processes, to introducing new products or therapies to providers and patients.

Regardless of the reason, communication at the professional level plays a fundamental role in every facet of healthcare. In the last decade, the avenues available for reaching target audiences have multiplied exponentially, ranging from social media to direct communications.

As one example, when the FDA approves a new medication, the message a pharmaceutical company wants to convey to consumers will center around how the new therapy can improve patients’ lives; the message to physicians focuses on the medication’s safety and efficacy, patient indication and reimbursement.

Many factors are at play in a changing healthcare landscape, and uncertainty fosters opportunity. Our industry, whether the focus be investor relations, strategic public relations, product publicity or social media, is likely to see a bevy of communications firms launch new departments devoted to healthcare, according to a recent blog post in PR News.

Communications advisory firms and agencies that will thrive in the new healthcare landscape are those that can help create new narratives for their clients, along with messaging that resonates and facilitates the right exposure for an organization’s products or services among many stakeholders, including existing and potential customers, investors and key opinion leaders.

Change is the constant in the healthcare sector, and smart, effective communication remains paramount.

– Joanna Rice, jrice@pondel.com

Small Talk at Annual Shareholders’ Meetings

We’re nearing the end of the season with respect to annual shareholders’ meetings, and taking a constructive look at what went right or wrong is always helpful in anticipation of next year.

Perhaps one of the most daunting aspects of annual shareholders’ meetings is when investors and management teams are mingling outside of the formal meeting session. How should management navigate small talk with investors?

Following are tips to keep in mind:

  • Be mindful of selective disclosure. If you think you’ve disclosed previously undisclosed material information, consult your CEO, CFO, general counsel or IR representative.
  • Proactively engaging in conversation with investors is OK, and actually encouraged.
  • It’s fine to say, “I don’t know.”
  • Talk in plain English. Keep it simple by avoiding company or industry jargon and acronyms.
  • Respond to questions in a direct, concise manner. Try not to wander off on tangents.
  • Do not make future projections.
  • Remain courteous, even if an attendee isn’t. Of course, if a conversation escalates to an unreasonable level, engaging security or even law enforcement is always an option.
  • Do not wander outside of your area of expertise. If you’re not sure about something, refer the question to the appropriate person.
  • Collect business cards or contact information of every investor you spoke with, and pass along to your IR representative.
  • Introduce investors to IR representatives if a follow-up is appropriate.

– Evan Pondel, epondel@pondel.com

Exceptional CEOs

I’ve worked with many CEOs over the last 25 years. Some great, some good, and some who didn’t quite make the grade.  The great ones had a few traits in common…they were excellent communicators, compassionate and whip smart.  (Italicized text represents my own editorial.)

The Harvard Business Review recently outlined four essential behaviors of successful CEOs:

  • Making quick decisions with conviction. Decisive.
  • Engaging for impact. Collaborative.
  • Proactively adapting. Doer.
  • Delivering reliably. Expectation setter.

Russell Reynolds Associates, a global search and leadership advisory firm, offers the following in their thought leadership blog:

  • Willingness to take calculated risks. Gutsy.
  • Bias toward action. Doer.
  • Ability to efficiently “read” people. Insightful.
  • Forward thinking. Innovative.
  • Intrepid. Courageous.

And from CNBC reporting on a panel at SXSW which examined the traits of many successful Silicon Valley CEOs:

  • Psychopathic???

I admit, this one stumped me. Dictionary.com describes psychopathy as “a mental disorder in which an individual manifests amoral and antisocial behavior, lack of ability to love or establish meaningful personal relationships, extreme egocentricity, failure to learn from experience, etc.”

Doesn’t exactly scream successful CEO to me. However, venture capitalist Bryan Stolle believes that psychopaths are common within the CEO ranks because to successfully start a company you need to be “uncompromising in your vision, which requires a hearty dose of both ego and persistence, and you have to be willing to sacrifice almost everything for success.”  Still not sure I buy it.

Dr. Igor Galynker, the associate chairman for research in the Department of Psychiatry at Mount Sinai Beth Israel, believes that “lacking empathy, more often than not, will help you in an environment where you have to make decisions that create negative consequences by necessity for other people.” I’ve never known or worked with a psychopathic CEO, but according to a 2016 study, 21 percent of senior professionals in the U.S. had “clinically significant levels of psychopathic traits.”  Kind of frightening for those working with these 21 percent.

While collaboration, innovation and insightfulness are clearly important CEO qualities, I suppose it is possible that a little bit of ego, tenacity and charm could also result in success.

Laurie Berman, lberman@pondel.com

Not Your Average Covfefe

Whether investor relations or strategic public relations, or even in politics, we all know that words matter.

Every once in a while, I get stumped, sometimes amused, by simple-sounding, strange words that I have never seen before. Some only have four letters. I jotted down ten real words I read over the past couple of months that I am happy to share with PW Insight readers.

Test yourself and see how many you know. And please send me a quick email if you get even half of them right. Call me immediately if you know them all.

  1. flense
  2. tankles
  3. nish
  4. fob
  5. wheedle
  6. lanx
  7. puce
  8. yeta
  9. peen
  10. pelf

The answers:

  1. to strip blubber or skin from a whale or a fish
  2. a sound louder than a tinkle
  3. nothing
  4. chain attached to a watch
  5. to coax by flattery
  6. a platter for serving meat
  7. a dark red or purple/brown color
  8. awesome
  9. end of a hammer head opposite the face
  10. money gained in a dishonorable way

Roger Pondel, rpondel@pondel.com

Pretzels as a Barometer of Being Busy

Every office has its busy times, be they monthly, quarterly or annually.Pretzek

For investor relations and public relations firms, such periods vary from quarterly financial reporting, to client crises, and unexpected projects. In our office, a look at our “pretzel barrel” and how fast it is depleted is a great gauge of how busy we are.

It is filled every Monday, and by most normal Fridays, it is half full. Other Fridays, about a quarter full…which signifies a busy week; and during earnings season, I’m surprised there’s a pretzel left.

I’m not sure how or why the pretzel barrel got started in our office, but the origin of pretzels is intriguing. As the story goes, pretzels were created by an Italian monk more than 2000 years ago, who baked strips of dough and folded them into a shape resembling a child crossing his arms in prayer. The pretzel history books say nothing about the added salt.

When eating pretzels in 2017, perhaps we are subconsciously praying for help; or, as today’s health-oriented psychologists may say…we may be stress eating.

Regardless of the reason we eat pretzels—some of us do so simply because we like them—keeping one’s composure during busy times is key. I must admit that our staff is pretty good about maintaining the calm. Most days, it sure feels like we are busy. But heck, it’s Friday, and this week our barrel is still three-quarters full.

–Janet Simmons, jsimmons@pondel.com

Memorial Day Marketing

While Memorial Day is sort of the unofficial start of summer, the holiday is a solemn one, established to honor fallen servicemen and women of the U.S. military.

It’s also a time for big summer sales … and everyone from car brands to home improvement centers are getting in on the action.09977D90-C0C4-FB0A-F09894BE0965A93A

Too many times, however, brands take exception to the true meaning of Memorial Day, putting them in the proverbial hot seat. One beer company actually tweeted: “Something to remember on #MemorialDay. It’s a LOT better and a LOT more memorable with #craftbeer!”

Scores of companies continue to miss the Memorial Day mark, with some even issuing apologies responding to their own self-induced holiday crises. Much of the trouble occurs when brands try to mix “summer fun” and Memorial Day.

Marketers need to be aware of the potential backlash of being perceived as insensitive to veterans and their families. While tagging #MemorialDay may increase engagement, it may get the kind of attention marketers don’t want, so consider these three simple tips:

  • Don’t do it. When posting about honoring military men and women, do not segue to any hint of shopping, sales, BBQs, or anything of the like.
  • Enjoy summer. It’s OK to post products or services that showcase summer fun, whether it’s a beer at a picnic, or bathing suit at the beach. Be careful, though, when it comes to hashtags: #MemorialDayWeekend vs. #MemorialDay.
  • Traffic talk. Millions of folks will be hitting the road this weekend and that can only mean one thing: traffic! Find unique, interesting and brand appropriate ways to tie into the travel aspect of the long weekend.

There’s a certain finesse when it comes to marketing Memorial Day. Good judgment and not mixing service with sale will make for holiday-appropriate content.

– George Medici, gmedici@pondel.com

The Protocols of Selling a Story

Everyone is selling something.  It doesn’t matter if you’re in business, education, or politics, we’re all trying to sell a widget, a way of thinking, a party affiliation.  The difference is the method in which something is sold.

For example, are solid facts used to back up a thesis about why a consumer should buy something?  Does an educator emote and use theatrics to explain a concept to students?  How authentic is a politician when she or he attempts to relate to the needs and wants of constituents?

The IR world is no different in that most public companies are creating investor theses to sell a company’s story.  There are a lot of variables that influence the efficacy of a pitch to investors.  But in the spirit of writing a pithy blog post in 500 words or less, following is an abridged guide to what’s hot and what’s not when selling a company’s story in today’s market:

What’s Hot

  • Financial Performance – Nothing beats a solid track record of financial performance when trying to attract investors
  • Transparency – The easier it is for investors to understand a company’s model, P&L, and balance sheet, the more likely an investor will be inclined to take a calculated risk and invest
  • Management Relevance – There is a distinction between relevance and years of experience. Relevance is demonstrating why an executive is the best person for the job today, not a decade ago
  • Long-Term Competitive Advantage – The company must present a compelling thesis in terms of why it has built one of the greatest mouse traps that goes the distance when up against competitors
  • Consistent Communication – Somewhat self-serving here, but if all of the aforementioned items are firing on all cylinders and there is no communication … <insert that sucking sound>

What’s Not

  • Hyperbole – Adjectives such as “leading,” “best,” “greatest,” often instill more skepticism than confidence
  • Homogenous Board – In the age of activism, boards of directors are easy targets, especially if they lack independence and diversity
  • Compensation that Isn’t Tied to Performance – Speaks for itself
  • Press Release Overload – Some companies are prolific and have an endless stream of news to relay to investors, although it becomes rather obvious when companies are simply issuing press releases for the sake of “looking” productive
  • Revolving Door in C-Suite – Too much turnover at the top doesn’t curry favor with most investors

– Evan Pondel, epondel@pondel.com

The 10 Plagues of Investor Relations

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You may be asking yourself, what does Passover have to do with investor relations and strategic public relations?  Not much, actually, but in honor of the holiday I thought it might be interesting to name ten things plaguing our industry.  Not so different, I guess, from naming the ten plagues that have become part of the Seder (a feast that marks the beginning of Passover).  But don’t worry my fellow practitioners, while some of things we have to deal with can be pretty disturbing, we generally won’t come in contact with boils, locusts or diseased fowl in our professional lives.

The 10 Investor Relations Plagues

  1. Short selling
  2. Activists/proxy fight
  3. Scheduling
  4. Fake news/bad news
  5. Value gaps
  6. Crises
  7. Market volatility
  8. Short-term mentalities
  9. Guidance
  10. Shareholder litigation

I’m sure there are others we’ve omitted, so drop us a note and let us know what sort of plagues you’ve had to deal with in the IR world.

Laurie Berman, lberman@pondel.com

Beware of Lurking Wolves

Sometimes, I pick up my own phone at the office. Last week, a friendly caller caught me off guard. The conversation went something like this:

Caller: Hello, Roger, how are you?

Roger: Fine, thanks, how ‘bout yourself?

Caller: I am also fine, thank you for asking. I am calling to let you know that our analysts have started recommending the stocks of several conservative, dividend-paying, major oil companies They are very safe investments, and I would like to start a relationship with you.

Roger: Pardon me?

Caller:  I also want you to know that from time to time we come across the stocks of some smaller companies that our analysts research thoroughly. And within the next week or so, there is one that we will be formally recommending, because of some announcements we believe the company will we making in the next two months.

Roger: Who is this?

Caller: I will give you my full contact information in a minute, but please let me finish.

Roger: May I have your name and the name of your company?

Caller: Now Roger, no one can predict what will happen to the price when those announcements start to flow, but I would like to call you at the right time, so that as a client, you may take advantage of our knowledge. Buying a few shares of a major oil company can establish the account, then we can move quickly on the smaller companies at the right time.

I never got the fellow’s name, since I hung up on him. But his pitch was familiar. It was reminiscent of cold calls that came in prior to the 2013 release of The Wolf of Wall Street.

Almost comedic, but perhaps disturbing, the call was the second one I received—with precisely the same script—in the past couple of weeks. Could the wolves be coming back? Have their prison terms ended? Perhaps it’s the perceived frothy Dow. Or maybe the fake news mantra. Or the newswire upstarts that make it ridiculously inexpensive, and often without traditional controls, to transmit press releases from virtually any source.

Most readers of this blog know better and would not fall for such scam calls. But beware, nevertheless. Hopefully, history is not repeating itself.

Roger Pondel, rpondel@pondel.com

IR Movie Titles

The Oscars are upon us, and while the awards have absolutely nothing to do with investor relations, it is uncanny how many movie titles could actually apply to a film about investor relations. Following is a list of old and new movie titles that hit the mark.

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Dances with Wolves
Trading Places
The Good, the Bad and the Ugly
Up in Smoke
Get Out
Hidden Figures
La La Land
St. Elmo’s Fire
The Founder
Revenge of the Nerds
Bonfire of the Vanities
Split
The Salesman
Chasing Amy
Frozen
The Boss Baby
Tequila Sunrise
Million Dollar Baby

Add to the list at #IRmovietitles.