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Lying to the Media is Never OK, Never Was, Never Will Be

A recent op-ed in the Los Angeles Times, “Who is Hope Hicks, and What’d she do?” by Virginia Heffernan has struck a chord among PR pros.

Newly appointed Hicks, 29, is the third director of communications for the current White House, and the youngest in history to hold that position.

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Hope Hicks followed by White House Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders. Photo credit: Doug Mills/The New York Times

While news of her relationship with former Trump Staff Secretary Rob Porter was not the subject of Heffernan’s editorial, the author’s portal of Hick’s job as a “flack” is what’s sending shockwaves throughout the public relations industry.

For those unaware, a flack is a pejorative term sometimes used by journalists to label less-than-scrupulous public relations people, not to be confused with a “hack,” which connotes a security breach or taxi driver, and is a term occasionally used to label a “sloppy” journalist. Both have negative connotations.

According to Heffernan, Hicks was born into a “family of high-level flacks, whitewashing the unsavory practices or grave misdeeds of Texaco, the NFL, Harvey Weinstein and Donald Trump,” a reference to her family’s work as crisis communications counselors, and now as the White House communications chief, potentially deceiving the public regarding an obstruction of justice charge.

Right, wrong or indifferent, op-eds are opinion pieces. And the author of this one certainly got it wrong when she wrote, “lying to the media is traditionally called PR.”

No, it’s not. It never was and never will be.

Ironically, the PR industry at times may grapple with its own image problem. However, references to spin doctors and flacks only perpetuate a stereotype.

PR pros are essentially spokespeople, not always necessarily quoted in stories, working in the background, assisting reporters to help them do their jobs. Whether representing a brand, association or publicly traded company, PR practitioners are usually the first point of contact between reporters and clients. Building meaningful relationships with journalists based on trust is paramount to effective media relations, and to the livelihoods and careers of many public relations executives.

Although the percentage has slipped from 2016 to 2017, PR practitioners are still the third most important sources of information for journalists, behind subject experts and industry professionals, according to the 2017 Global Social Journalism Study.

One can agree that it takes a certain skill to effectively navigate any crisis communications situation, especially in a hostile media environment. Reporter deadlines coupled with mounting pressure only adds to the stress of providing timely, accurate, and credible information. But that is what makes the PR industry so specialized.

Every profession can have bad actors, or those on occasion that make mistakes, but the PR industry abides by a code of ethics, values vital to the integrity of the profession as a whole. It’s not fair, nor appropriate, to single out one instance to characterize an entire industry.

Lying to media only gets PR practitioners shunned as ineffective communicators, which often leads to loss of clients, loss of jobs, and the end to careers.

— George Medici, gmedici@pondel.com

 

Sunday Mornings May Never Be the Same

My favorite part of Sunday morning is relaxing over a cup of coffee while leisurely reading both the New York Times and Los Angeles Times–every section–without that harried feeling of having to skip and skim stories like I do the rest of the week, or use the speed reading techniques I learned from my 11th grade English teacher, Mr. Coughlin.

The Times-Picayne (Photo Source: wikipedia.com)

 
I even savor the smell of the newsprint, which combined with the coffee aroma, exudes a state of calm. But I am worried that the Sunday papers may not be around too much longer. And while the thought of sipping coffee with an iPad doesn’t exactly thrill me, I am reluctantly bracing for the future. Of course, it’s all about technology, which is changing our lives–granted, mostly for the better–and changing the media landscape at breakneck speed.
 
Within the last couple of weeks alone, The Times-Picayune in New Orleans told the world it will be cutting back its print editions to three days a week.  That same day, three other newspapers followed suit.  Like a tsunami, a few days later, a Canadian newspaper chain, Postmedia, announced that its three newspapers will be eliminating their Sunday editions.
 
These were not the first such actions, of course, but the pace of such change seems to be picking up speed.  The shift to online news certainly makes sense from an economic point of view. It’s just that it makes me sad and I would think that there are others like me that feel the same way.
 
But it’s not just about relaxing with the paper on Sunday mornings. It’s quality of content, as well as
quantity, with lost columns and generally fewer investigative pieces and features.  And add to that, perhaps saddest of all, is lost jobs.  When the change takes place at The Times-Picayune, expectations are that about a third of the journalists will be cut.
 
I’d like to think that in the biggest U.S. cities we’ll always have our Sunday papers.  But I guess
there’s a good chance that we will not. So as my psychotherapist wife repeatedly tells me, enjoy the moment. Sunday mornings may never be the same.

 

Roger Pondel, rpondel@pondel.com