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The Right Stuff

NIRI (the National Investor Relations Institute) recently reviewed the investor relations Web sites of the 100 largest publicly traded companies in an effort to develop a set of best-in-class practices.  The results were presented in a comprehensive Executive Alert distributed to members.
 
Some highlights to keep in mind when reviewing or building your own IR site:
 

  • Provide direct contact information for the IR team (include both internal and external contacts).
  • Use common names for standard pieces of information to make them more easily identifiable to users.
  • Don’t burry important company messages in your FAQ.  Create separate sections for key information such as shareholder services.
  • Avoid having the site launch new windows as a way of accessing content or functionality.

 
Additionally, certain core elements were found among the Web sites that were reviewed:
 

  • 92% contained earnings press releases;
  • 92% contained stock quotes/charts;
  • 89% provided transfer agent information;
  • 87% offered webcasts;
  • 82% offered e-mail alerts;
  • 80% gave dividend information;
  • 77% included a historical stock price lookup feature and a history of stock splits; and
  • 62% included an investment calculator.

 
If you haven’t looked at the content on your investor relations Web site recently, now is a good time for a check-up.  As we reported here on August 5, 2008, the SEC recently released new interpretive guidance that could give companies the ability to use their Web sites as an appropriate full disclosure outlet.  The more up-to-date and feature rich your site, the better chance you’ll have of meeting the SEC’s Web site disclosure guidelines.

 

— Laurie Berman, Senior Vice President, lberman@pondel.com
 
 

Are Web Sites a Suitable Disclosure Outlet?

According to the Securities and Exchange Commission, the answer is…maybe.  The SEC’s new interpretive guidance states that posting material information on a corporate Web site may satisfy Regulation FD, but that the facts and circumstances of each case must be weighed first.
 
According to law firm, Cravath, Swaine & Moore LLP, several factors must be determined before a Web site can be used as the sole means of disseminating material information.  These include:
 

  • whether the Web site is a recognized channel of information distribution;
  • how, where and when the information is posted and becomes broadly accessible to the public; and
  • the Web site’s capability to meet the “simultaneous or prompt” timing requirements of Regulation FD’s Rule 100 as well as the Web site’s capability to meet reasonable usage demands.

 
At this point, it’s probably a safer more shareholder friendly bet to continue utilizing the wire services to disclose important information.

 

Laurie Berman, Senior Vice President, lberman@pondel.com